yt 119896 How to make bread toast - How to make bread toast
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How to make bread toast

In this video we are going to show how to make bread toast

Original of the video here

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Video Transcription

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6 Replies to “How to make bread toast

  1. He leído con gran interés su artículo sobre How to
    make bread toast » Video Bakey y puedo decir que es
    uno de los mejores artículos que he leído. Es por eso que quiero compartir un sitio web que me
    ha ayudado mucho a perder peso, y ahora estoy feliz de nuevo: https://bit.ly/3bWh8jG

  2. I swear I’ve read comments like “I’ve never worked with chocolate before, but I think 29 degrees would be better than 28 degrees.” That kind of comment is not the way to get positive attention from an influential blogger or establish yourself as an expert.
    When I read comments I’m always amazed by how many people admit (admit!) they have no idea what they’re talking about and then go on to make recommendations, suppositions, or write long rambling analyses based on nothing more than a pure guess.

  3. Say what temperature is better and why. Maybe say where you get your information. Is it based on your experience, the recommendations of the Chocolate Storage Association, or just your own wild guess? Make a point.
    At that temperature, the chocolate will go bad.” Really, all you’ve said is “You’re wrong.” You need to say *why* the temperature is wrong.

  4. Make sure you include the reason you disagree. It’s easier than you think to avoid making a point. Consider the comment “You’re spreading lies by saying the ideal temperature for chocolate storage is 28 degrees.
    Why is it wonderful? Why did you love it? It’s even more important to make a point when you disagree. It’s a waste of time to just write “You’re wrong,” or a longer ranting equivalent.

  5. Sure, most bloggers will lap up short comments like “Wonderful!” “I love it!” and “Thank you,” and if all you want to do is express gratitude or brighten their day, comments like that are fine, but you’ll make a more lasting impression and a more meaningful contribution to the conversation if you say a bit more.
    I shouldn’t have to tell you this, but comments that start out “You’re an idiot,” are laced with profanity, or are just plain disrespectful, undermine the authority of your argument. Nobody gives much credence to an obnoxious troll. So aside from the pleasure you get from annoying people, you’re wasting your time writing such comments. Always remember there is a real person reading your comment. It’s easy to be mean while hiding behind the anonymity of the Web, but you shouldn’t say anything you wouldn’t say in person.

  6. For example, instead of just starting out “Humidity is important too!” it’s helpful if you start with some context like “User Squiggly1234 has a point about chocolate storage temperature, but has missed one important variable” and then go on to talk about humidity. That way other commenters won’t be confused as to why you started talking about bad hair weather on a post about chocolate.
    I know as you’re writing your comment *you* know what you’re responding to—maybe it’s the article or video or maybe it’s someone else’s comment, but when people come to the page later and read the comments, it isn’t always immediately clear what you’re talking about. It’s most important to provide context when there are a lot of comments. If comments are coming in really fast, for example, yours can get separated from the comment to which you’re responding.

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